Welcome to Newcomb, NY!

Not every town has enjoyed as many transformations as Newcomb. From First Nations hunting and fishing presence, to agriculture, to logging, to mining, to recreation, Newcomb has always been a vibrant, if small, community. The area was historically claimed by both Haudenosaunee and Algonquin tribes, and was part of the colonial frontier between New York and New France. After settlement in 1816 it supported many farms, and was a prominent lumber town and home to the summer pasturage for Finch Pryun’s herd of logging horses. Iron deposits discovered nearby in 1826 led to a transition to mining, with the creation of the mining community of Adirondac, also known as "The Upper Works." The mine closed in the mid 1850's, although renewed mining (for titanium) began in 1941. This led to the creation a new community, Tahawus, located about three miles down the Hudson River from Adirondac. That, too, eventually ended and Tahawus is now also a famous ghost town. 

Newcomb is by all measures a gorgeous place, with a mix of mountains and forests, lakes, ponds, and the Hudson River. It is home to Santanoni Preserve, one of the few remaining Adirondack Great Camps and the only one owned by the State and freely accessible to the public. It is maintained in historically accurate condition as an architectural museum, and is an ideal destination for year-round recreation. In addition to annual summer staff interpreting its history for visitors, there are many fun events held year-round targeted at both adventurers and families.

Another great option for exploring Newcomb is a visit to the Adirondack Interpretive Center, operated by SUNY-ESF. The 236-acre property has 3.6 miles of well-maintained trails wandering through many different Adirondack habitats, complete with bridges, boardwalks, and scenic outlook platforms. The AIC trails are open year-round, dawn to dusk. No snowshoes or microspikes? No problem — they are available for free on site. ESF also maintains the trail up Goodnow Mountain with its 60’ fire tower and outstanding 360 view, including to the High Peaks just north of Newcomb.

Paddling and fishing are also popular activities in Newcomb, with great experiences to be had on Rich, Belden, and Harris lakes. Harris has a lovely town beach with a monitored public swim area and separate dock and boat launch for paddlers and boaters. For the more adventurous, Lake Harris connects to the Hudson River providing additional paddling opportunities.

a snowmobiler crosses a snowy bridge.
two skis on the snow.
a woman directs hikers in an information center.
an aerial shot of an frozen over lake.

 

 

 

 

Visit Newcomb on the web or contact at:

Newcomb Information Center

4995 NY-28N

Newcomb, NY 12852

Phone: (518)509-3603

Fax: (518)509-3614

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There are bridges and viewing stands for maximum enjoyment of the scenery.
There are bridges and viewing stands for maximum enjoyment of the scenery.
5922 State Rte 28N, Newcomb
The Adirondack Park Visitor Interpretive Center in Newcomb serve as environmental education and tourist orientation centers. Miles of scenic, surfaced trails complemented by indoor exhibits and multi-image presentations on the park. In summer, there...
Upper Works Road, Newcomb
Mount Adams is a serious climb but for those who tackle it, the views and the hike are very rewarding. The summit features at 47-foot steel fire tower, used in its heyday as a tool in the forest fire prevention effort by New York State.
5575 Route 28N, Newcomb
Newcomb Caf? and Campground General Store-Gas Pump-ATM Open 8:00 am to 3:00 pm CLOSED Tuesdays Serving delicious breakfast and lunch! Located in the Heart of the Park - Newcomb, NY. Adirondacks High Peaks. Cafe, Campground, luxury cabin rentals...
20 Marcy Lane, Newcomb
Kids of all ages can enjoy some traditional winter fun at the Newcomb Sledding Hill! How to get there The sledding hill is located at Libern H. Yandon Recreational Park, which is across the street from Overlook Park in Newcomb. The hill itself is...
Newcomb
Gray Peak is the tallest of the trailless High Peaks and has an act of putting on two totally different faces depending on the season. In summer, it is slightly treed with stunted growth; in winter the trees are buried and it resembles that of a bald...